What to Expect With Your Pool Installation

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Installing a pool in your backyard is major construction, there’s no way around it. Deciding on a backyard pool is a lifetime investment which involves changes to your yard, some of them temporary and many of them permanent.

There is definitely an emotional component to having your yard and property disrupted with equipment and tracks.  Large machinery is usually required for excavation, if you are going with fiberglass there may even be a crane needed to expertly place the pool shell correctly. With all of this machinery comes added noise and different people with different responsibilities coming in and out of the project (which just happens to be going on in your yard). There will always be at least some form of turmoil regardless of pool type. You may get the feeling of moving "backwards" but please keep in mind that this is only happening in order to move "forwards".

Having people in your yard that you aren’t used to can be difficult. The physical appearance of the property and the way that things look will sometimes need to be altered. Unfortunately, things will need to be disturbed. In order to get to the beauty there does need to be a bit of destruction as your dream backyard takes shape. What’s normal is now upside down and sometimes this can be difficult. Most contractors understand this. Many people are creatures of habit, have certain routines, and appreciate things in their natural order. When you install a pool, what has always been normal is now upside down. Some people can struggle with this adjustment but having an unsettled reaction is very understandable.

What may have been a beautiful lawn that children and/or grandchildren played on, or there was many celebrations and parties on a patio that needed to be removed, or the grass and flower beds are now stones, rocks, and mud can all seem like there is no end in sight. Well, we are here to tell you that there is.

We encourage customers to get a head start on understanding the process by educating themselves with the many resources that are available but also prepare a list of questions so that during the planning and site visits your contracting company can provide you with answers. Most contractors want the project to go as smooth as possible and truly want to provide the best service as possible. Contractors should also offer the ability to provide previous customers who are willing to be contacted as used as references. These folks are typically available to answer questions and to be resources for the prospective customer or someone who may need additional clarification.

A good pool contractor will tell you the process and explain all of the points up front. They will also make themselves available to answer any questions and work to manage expectations throughout the process so there’s no surprises and transparency is on the very front burner. If you have a conversation with a pool contractor to ensure that if you choose them that you’ll “hardly know they are there” you should continue prospecting as this couldn’t be any further from the truth regardless of the type of pool that you decide to go with. A contractor that isn’t setting your expectations correctly is not a great way to start a potential project. Getting through this starts with having confidence and faith in the contractor that you choose and allow them to do their job and execute the plan that you talked about. You as the customer may need to have both understanding and patience as the process is worked through with the complete understanding that all questions will be answered and any issues taken care of.

Many parts of the job will be gone over previous to any work starting but just like any construction project there is the potential for surprises. Heavy equipment will need access to your yard. Again, there is no way around this. For this to happen there may be a need to temporarily remove things like shrubs, trees, or even some fencing. Some of this equipment weighs a considerable amount and could leave marks on your lawn. Maneuvering in a yard is always done with great care but taking any machinery across things like a sidewalk or a driveway always creates potential for damage. A swimming pool contractor and their staff are also usually at the mercy of the weather. It is potentially very dangerous to operate heavy machinery during a rain storm and it may even cause more damage than needed to your yard. It is not out of the ordinary for the project to come to a complete halt during large storms and also to give the ground a chance to properly dry. The quality of the soil underneath or the encountering of bedrock or shale could be unexpected issues that can be dealt with but may cause additional steps with the potential of additional costs as well. If the soil isn’t what is needed to support the pool, then stone may need to be hauled in to strengthen the area. If rock ledge is encountered, there may be a need for additional excavation means to be called in.

It is a good idea to ask your pool builder what is covered in the contract and what isn’t when it comes site preparation issues, accessibility problems, management of the dirt (fill) that is taken out any changes to the landscape and what could cause additional charges to be incurred. It is important to understand that when the pool installer is done that your yard will not be ready to appear in a magazine. You will have use of your new pool and you can go ahead with a landscaping, deck, patio etc. plan at your own pace. Not all of those things need to be done at once and it is very typical to continue building your backyard up over the course of several years.

With pool construction there are somewhat unattractive means to a very beautiful end and unfortunately everyone has to go through it. Your pool project may not go exactly to the plan that was spoken about. Doing the research and asking all of the question that you need to ask will give you a better understanding, allow you to be more prepared, and make the process as stress free as is possible.

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